UK Weapons Law

 


UK Legislation

Click on the links below to go straight to the section of interest:

Air Guns | Paintball Guns | Realistic Imitation Firearms | Imitation Firearms | Blank firing Guns | Replica Guns | Airsoft Guns | Firearms/Shotguns Guns | Crossbows | Archery | Deactivated Weapons Antique Guns | Knives, edged/spiked Weapons | Other banned weapons | What counts as a firearm in UK? | Realistic Imitation Firearm (RIF) Guidance
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Air Guns

An airgun doesn’t require a firearms license if the rifles power is 12ft lbs or lower and pistols are 6ft lbs or lower. Be sensible when using and transporting, it is not illegal to own one over 18 yrs old but they should not be carried in public and only used on private land/ property with the landowners permission. Respect should be given at all times as it is a lethal weapon if used incorrectly. Be very careful where you shoot and ensure there is plenty of room beyond where you are aiming in case you miss.

Paintball Guns

The Home Office does not consider paintball markers to be firearms because they fire frangible ammunition, which break up on contact rather than inflicting a penetrating injury. The paintball industry uses the Air Weapons section of the firearms act 1968 to regulate the sport.

  • For a paintball marker to be classed as an ‘Air Weapon’, and therefore not require a license, it must not be fired above 12 ft/lbs for a ‘rifle’ type(over 60cm length) and 6 ft/lbs for a “pistol” type(under 60cm length). If a marker fires above these limits they will then come under the Firearms Act 1968 and require a FAC as they will be classed as a prohibited weapon. The recent amendment included carbon dioxide as an approved propellant previously only compressed air was allowed.
  • Paintball markers must also only fire approved paintballs. On registered insured paintball gaming sites a paintball markers must not be fully automatic i.e. when pulling the trigger once, two or more paintballs must not be discharged.
  • To stay within the law a rifle type paintball marker must not be fired above 330fps when using an average weight paintball, this equates to 12 ft/lbs for a rifle and 6ft lbs for a pistol.

18 Years or Older

  • If you are 18 Years or Older there are no restrictions on buying a non FAC paintball marker or airgun and ammunition, and you can use it wherever you have permission to shoot.
  • It is legal as a private individual not operating as a business to sell a second hand paintball marker /airgun to a person aged 18 years or over without face to face contact ie. You can send it direct to their home address via a courier.
  • Air gun Trade/Business sales must be done face to face to comply with the VCR Act 2006 this means you either have to go into the shop to complete the transaction or some mail order retailers will post to your local gun shop for you to go in and collect. This complies with the rule of a face to face sale.

14-17 Years Old Years Old
You can:

  • Borrow a paintball marker/airgun and ammunition
  • Use a paintball marker/airgun, without supervision, on private premises where you have permission

You cannot:

  • Buy or hire a paintball marker/ airgun, or ammunition, or receive one as a gift. Your paintball marker/airgun and ammunition must be bought and looked after by someone over 18 – normally your parent, guardian or some other responsible adult.
  • Have a paintball marker/ airgun in a public place unless you are supervised by somebody aged 21 or over, and you have a reasonable excuse to do so (for example, while on the way to a shooting ground or paintball game).

Under 14 Years Old
You can:

  • Use a paintball marker/airgun under supervision on private premises with permission from the occupier – normally the owner or tenant. The person who supervises you must be at least 21 years old.

You Cannot:

    • Buy, hire or receive a paintball marker/airgun or its ammunition as a gift, or shoot, without adult supervision.
    • Parents or guardians who buy a paintball marker/ airgun for use by someone under 14 must exercise control over it at all times, even in the home or garden.

 

  • It is illegal to sell a paintball marker/ airgun or ammunition to a person under 18 years of age.

 


Realistic Imitation Firearms (RIF)

look like a real firearm regarding colour and size and are classed as modern. All Airsoft, blank firing guns and replica guns are governed by this legislation – please see below for further information on each of these. Note that if it’s style is pre-1870, such as wild west/cowboy gun, it is exempt from the VCR Act RIF legislation.
Imitation Firearms (IF) are regarded to be unrealistic if it is made of transparent material or has a principal colour of:

bright red       bright orange       bright yellow       bright green       bright pink       bright purple       bright blue

Blank Firing Guns

Note as follows:

  • Be sensible when using and transporting blank firing guns, it is not illegal to own a blank gun over 18 yrs old but they should not be carried in public and only used on private land/property with the landowners permission. Respect should be given at all times as the discharging burning powder can cause serious injury.
  • Blank firers and ammo are legal to own without a license in the UK. However UK-legal blank firers are different to those sold on the continent and USA.
    Along with complying with the VCR Act 2006 you have to comply with the Firearms act 1968. For a UK blank gun to be compliant it must discharge the blank cartridge gas out of the top of the gun and have a solid blocked barrel.
  • European /USA models discharge the blank cartridge gas from the barrel and sometimes have a flare attachment. These are a section 1 firearms item in the UK as they are classed as a Readily Convertible Imitations (see below).

An imitation weapon will be treated as a firearm to which section 1 of the Firearms Act 1968 applies if:

  • It has the appearance of such a weapon; and can be readily convertible into a weapon from which a shot, bullet or other missile can be discharged (ss1(1) an 1(2) Firearms Act 1968).
  • Readily convertible” means “it can be so converted without any special skill on the part of the person converting it and the work involved in converting it does not require equipment or tools other than such as are in common use by persons carrying out works of construction and maintenance in their own homes.” (Section 1(6) Firearms Act 1982).

As these discharge from the barrel they are easily converted to fire a missile and many come with a screw in flare attachment to launch flares which is classed as a missile. Beware: Buying this type of blank gun without a firearms license can get you in serious trouble. At best it could cost you a lot of money in solicitor’s fees to fight your case in court.
18 Years or Older
You Can:

  • Buy, own, import or have gifted a blank firing ‘IF’ and ammunition.
  • Continue to possess a blank firing ‘RIF’ bought prior to the VCR Act 2006, even if you are not covered by a defence in Appendix A.
  • Buy or sell a blank firing ‘RIF’ if it is altered to become a simple ‘IF’ that conforms to the guidelines in the VCR Act 2006
  • Sell a blank firing ‘RIF’ if the purchaser benefits from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation( see appendix A). The responsibility lies with the seller to establish the right of the purchaser to buy.

You Cannot:

  • Buy a blank firing ‘RIF’ unless the purchaser benefits from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation( see appendix A).
  • Modify a blank firing ‘IF’ to become a ‘RIF’ unless the purchaser benefits from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation (see appendix A).
  • Import a blank firing ‘RIF’ (e.g mail order from abroad) if it vents blank gasses from end of barrel unless you have the appropriate FAC.
  • Import a top venting blank firing ‘RIF’ (e.g mail order from abroad) if you do not benefit from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation( see appendix A).
  • Have a blank firing ‘IF’ or ‘RIF’ in a public place without a ‘reasonable excuse’.

Under 18 Years Old
You Cannot:

  • Purchase a blank firing ‘RIF’ or ‘IF’ or
  • Sell to a person under 18 yrs old

Both of the above are offences.

Replica Guns

Replica/dummy guns are similar to Blank firing guns but do not fire live or blank cartridges. They are legal to own without a license in the UK. Before the VCR act 2006 these were available as exact replicas of the live firing version. Now that the VCR act 2006 is in place they would be classed as a ‘RIF’ so can only be sold to persons covered by the list in Appendix A. The exception to this are replica guns pre 1870 style such as Wild West/Cowboy guns. These are not restricted under the VCR act 2006 so can be bought and sold without constraint apart from the age limit of 18 or over.
Be sensible when transporting these and remember that pre-1870 replica guns cannot be carried in public. To most people including Police these would still look like a firearm and attract a ‘firearm in a public place’ police response, which would most likely result in an armed Police unit being called.
18 Years or Older
You Can:

  • Buy and sell ‘RIF’ of pre-1870 style such as Wild West/Cowboy guns.
  • If you are 18 Years or Older, buy own or have gifted a replica gun ‘IF’.
  • Continue to possess a replica gun ‘RIF’ bought prior to the VCR Act 2006 even if you are not covered by a defence in Appendix A.
  • Buy or sell a replica gun ‘RIF’ if it is altered to become a simple ‘IF’ that conforms to the guidelines in the VCR Act 2006.
  • Sell a replica gun ‘RIF’ if the purchaser benefits from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation (see appendix A). The responsibility lies with the seller to establish the right of the purchaser to buy.

You Cannot:

  • Buy a replica gun ‘RIF’ unless the purchaser benefits from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation( see appendix A) or it is a pre-1870 replica guns such as Wild West/ Cowboy guns.
  • Modify a replica gun ‘IF’ to become a ‘RIF’ or import a replica gun ‘RIF’ (e.g mail order from abroad) if it does not conform to the specification stated in the VCR Act 2006 or is a replica of pre-1870 guns such as Wild West/Cowboy guns.
  • Have a replica gun ‘IF’ or ‘RIF’ in a public place without a ‘reasonable excuse’.

Under 18 Years Old
You cannot:

  • Purchase a replica gun ‘RIF’ or ‘IF’ or
  • Sell to a person under 18 yrs old

Both of the above are both offences.

Airsoft Guns

Be sensible when using and transporting Air Soft Guns. It is not illegal to own an Air Soft Gun over the age of 18, but they should not be carried in public and can only be used on private land/property with the landowners permission. Respect should be given at all times as the pellets can cause eye injury.
Airsoft guns and ammo are legal to own without a license in the UK but you must comply with the VCR Act 2006.

To purchase and own an Airsoft ‘RIF’ you must be a member of a registered Airsoft site which has public liability insurance. The United Kingdom Airsoft Retailers Association or UKARA shares the database of registered skirmishers with the member retailers allowing quick and easy verification that the purchaser is allowed to buy a ‘RIF’ under the VCRA skirmisher defence. To qualify for the UKARA database a person must be a regular skirmisher (i.e. skirmish three or more times in no less than two months, and typically at one site).
18 Years or Older
You Can:

  • Buy, sell, own or have gifted an AirSoft ‘IF’ and ammunition without being a registered Skirmisher at an insured site.
  • Continue to possess an Airsoft ‘RIF’ bought prior to the VCR Act 2006, even if you are not a re-enactor or involved in Airsoft skirmishing.
  • Buy or sell an AirSoft ‘RIF’ if it is altered to become a simple ‘IF’ that conforms to the guidelines in the VCR Act 2006
  • Sell an AirSoft ‘RIF’ if the purchaser is over 18yrs old and benefits from being a registered member of a skirmish site or has one of the other defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation (see appendix A). The responsibility lies with the seller to establish the right of the purchaser to buy.

You Cannot:

  • Buy an AirSoft ‘RIF’ unless the purchaser benefits from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation( see appendix A).
  • Modify an AirSoft ‘IF’ to become a ‘RIF’ or import a AirSoft ‘RIF’ (e.g mail order from abroad) unless the purchaser benefits from one of the defences provided in the VCR ACT 2006 legislation( see appendix A).
  • Have an AirSoft ‘IF’ or ‘RIF’ in a public place without a ‘reasonable excuse’.

17 Years or Less
You Can:

  • Own an AirSoft ‘IF’ or ‘RIF’ by being given the item as a gift or by having parental consent.

You Cannot:

  • Purchase an AirSoft ‘RIF’ or ‘IF’ or
  • Sell to a person under 18 yrs old

Both of the above are offences.


Firearms/Shotguns

Please note:

  • All transactions between private individuals must be face to face. Postal sales, purchases and other transfers are not permitted.
  • You should check the purchaser’s certificate to ensure it is still valid and that it has a photo on it to prove ownership of the certificate.
  • The seller must fill in table 2 of the purchaser’s certificate and sign it.
  • Both parties must then inform their respective Police forces of the transaction by recorded delivery within seven days.
  • It is wise to keep the recorded delivery slip safe.
  • The notification must include the names and addresses of both parties, the date, the nature of the transaction (sale, gift etc) and details of the gun(s) transferred.
  • Some Police forces provide a form for doing this which can be downloaded from their website. Even if your Police force doesn’t have this form you can use the form from another Police force’s site as it is generic.
  • As a matter of good practice, you should give the buyer a receipt for his purchase, making it clear what he has bought and the price paid. Keep a copy of this receipt for yourself.
  • Although not required by law it can be helpful to take a copy of the front page of the purchaser’s certificate for your record.

18 Years or Older
You Can:

  • Buy a Firearm /Shotgun and ammunition with the relevant certificate, and you can use it wherever you have permission to shoot.

Under 18 Years Old
You Can:

  • Hold a shotgun certificate
  • Hold a firearm certificate
  • Receive a gift of a shotgun from the age of 15 years (If authorised by the relevant certificate)
  • Receive a gift of a firearm from the age of 14 years (If authorised by the relevant certificate)
  • Possess a shotgun if covered and secured from the age of 15 years (If authorised by the relevant certificate)

You Cannot:

  • Purchase or hire shotguns until 18 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)
  • Purchase or hire firearms until 18 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)

Under 15 Years Old
You Can:

  • Hold a shotgun certificate
  • Hold a firearm certificate and receive a gift of a Section 1 firearm from the age of 14 years old (If authorised by the relevant certificate)

You Cannot:

  • Purchase or hire a shotgun until 18 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)
  • Purchase or hire a firearm until 18 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)
  • Receive a gift of a shotgun until 15 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)
  • Have an assembled shotgun unless supervised by a shotgun certificate holder over 21 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)
  • Have an uncovered/unsecured shotgun until 15 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)

Under 14 Years Old
You Can:

  • Hold a shotgun certificate

You Cannot:

  • Hold a firearm certificate
  • Purchase or hire shotguns until 18 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)
  • Receive a gift of a shotgun until 15 years old (Even if the holder of a relevant certificate)

Crossbows

Crossbows (Crossbows Act 1987 amended by VCR act 2006) advises that you should be sensible when using and transporting Crossbows. It is not illegal to own a Crossbow providing you are over the age of 18. Respect should be given at all times as it is a lethal weapon if used incorrectly. Be very careful where you shoot and ensure there is plenty of room beyond where you are aiming in case you miss.
18 Years or Older
You Can:

  • If you are 18 Years or Older no licence or registration is required to purchase /own a crossbow in the United Kingdom.
  • Use a crossbow on private land or premises with permission from the occupier – normally the owner or tenant.

You Cannot:

  • Use a crossbow in parks, woodland, farmland or any public space unless granted permission from occupier – normally the owner or tenant.
  • Hunting is illegal in the UK, it is also illegal to use broadhead bolts, you must only use target points.

Under 18 Years Old
You Can:

  • Use a crossbow under 18 years of age only when supervised by an adult defined as a person aged 21 years or over.
  • Use a crossbow on private land or premises with permission from the occupier – normally the owner or tenant.

You Cannot:

  • Sell or let on hire a crossbow or part there of to a person under the age of 18.
  • A person under the age of 18 cannot buy or hire a crossbow or part there of.
  • It is an offence for any person under the age of 18 to have with him a crossbow which is capable of discharging a missile, or parts of a crossbow which together can be assembled to form a crossbow capable of discharging a missile.
  • Use a crossbow in parks, woodland, farmland or any public space unless granted permission from occupier – normally the owner or tenant.
  • Hunting is illegal in the UK, it is also illegal to use broadhead bolts, you must only use target points.

Archery

Be sensible when using and transporting Archery bows and arrows. It is not illegal to own either bows or arrows, but they should not be carried in public and only used on private land with the landowners permission. Respect should be given at all times as it is a lethal weapon if used incorrectly. Be very careful where you shoot and ensure there is plenty of room beyond where you are aiming in case you miss.

No licence or registration is required to purchase/own a bow in the United Kingdom and there is no age restrictions on the sale of Archery equipment. Clubs do set lower age limits on using a bow which are normally around the comprehension of the safety rules and the ability to hold a bow under draw. If in any doubt speak with your local archery club.
You Can:

  • Use a bow on private land or premises with permission from the occupier – normally the owner or tenant.

You Cannot:

  • Use a bow in parks, woodland, farmland or any public space unless granted permission from occupier – normally the owner or tenant.
  • Hunting is illegal in the UK, it is also illegal to use broadhead bolts, you must only use target points.

Deactivated Weapons

If a weapon bears an approved house mark and has been certified in writing as de-activated, the item is presumed to be incapable of discharging bullets or shot. De-activated firearms are expressly excluded from the definition of realistic imitation firearm and are therefore not affected by the new realistic imitation offence: Section 8 Firearms (Amendment) Act 1988 & VCR act 2006. Basically this means they don’t need to be a bright colour of 51% or more to be owned or sold to over 18’s.

Be sensible when transporting deactivated weapons, and note that they must not be carried in public. As the owner, you know that these cannot live fire, but members of the public and Police do not know this, so you must assume that carrying one in public will induce a ‘firearm in a public place’ response. This would undoubtedly result in an armed Police unit being called.

Antique Guns

Section 58(2) of the 1968 Firearms Act exempts from the provisions of a firearms certificate all antique firearms which are sold, transferred, purchased, acquired or possessed as curiosities or ornaments. However, there is no definition of “antique” in the legislation. There is Home Office Guidance on the issue which states that the following pre-1939 weapons will be classified as antiques:

  • All muzzle-loading firearms
  • Breech-loading firearms capable of discharging a rim fire cartridige other than .22 inch or .23 inch (or their metric equivalents), 6mm or 9mm rim fire
  • Breech-loading firearms using ignition systems other than rim fire and centre fire (these include pin-fire and needle-fire ignition systems, as well as the more obscure lip fire, cup-primed, teat fire and base fire systems)
  • Breech-loading centre fire arms originally chambered for one of the obsolete cartridges listed in Appendix 5 of the Guidance, and which retain their original chambering
  • Shotguns and punt guns chambered for the following cartridges (expressed in imperial measurements): 32 bore, 24 bore, 14 bore, 10 bore (2 and 2 inch only), 8 bore, 4 bore, 3 bore, 2 bore, 1 bore, 1 1/4 bore and 1 1/2 bore, and vintage punt guns and shotguns with bores greater than 10. It also includes vintage (pre-1939) rifles in these bores.

The Guidance also states that old firearms which should not benefit from the exemption as antiques are set out below. The list is not exhaustive and there may be other types and calibres of firearms that should be considered “modern” rather than “antique”:

  • Shotguns and smooth-bored guns, including shot pistols, chambered for standard shotgun cartridges, 22 inch, 23 inch, 6mm and 9 mm rim fire cartridges unless otherwise specified in the list of obsolete shotgun chamberings in Appendix 5 of the Home Office Guidance on Firearms Law 2013 (link below);
  • Rifles and handguns chambered for .22 inch, .23 inch, 6mm or 9mm rim fire ammunition;
  • Revolvers, single-shot pistols and self-loading pistols which are chambered for, and will accept centrefire cartridges of the type .25, .30, .32, .38, .380, .44, .45, .450, .455 and .476 inch, or their metric equivalents including 6.35mm, 7.62mm, 7.63mm, 7.65mm, 8mm and 9 mm, unless otherwise specified in the list at Appendix 5;
  • Modern reproduction firearms or old firearms which have been modified to allow the use of shotgun cartridges or cartridges not listed in Appendix 5;
  • Weapons extensively modified after 1939;
  • Signalling pistols chambered for 1 and 1 1/2 inch cartridges or 26.5mm/27mm cartridges;
  • Pump-action and self-loading centre-fire rifles, except those examples originally chambered for one of the obsolete cartridges listed in Appendix 5 of the Guidance and retaining their original chamberings. The latter may benefit from an exemption as antiques under section 58(2) of the Firearms 1968 Act (as amended).

Further information and assistance can be found in Chapter 8 and Appendix 5 of the aforementioned Guidance accessible on the link below. View the guidance here


Knives, edged/spiked weapons

The laws about buying and carrying a knife depend on the type of knife, your age and your circumstances.
Basic laws on knives
It is illegal to:

  • Sell a knife of any kind (including cutlery and kitchen knives) to anyone under 18
  • Carry a knife in public without good reason – unless it’s a knife with a folding blade 3 inches long (7.62 cm) or less, eg a Swiss Army knife
  • Carry, buy or sell any type of banned knife (the list of banned knives is below)
  • Use any knife in a threatening way (even a legal knife, such as a Swiss Army knife)
  • Carry a lock knife (knives with blades that can be locked when unfolded)

Good reasons for carrying a knife
Examples of good reasons to carry a knife in public can include:

  • Taking knives you use at work to and from work
  • You’re taking knives to a gallery or museum to be exhibited
  • The knife is going to be used for theatre, film, television, historical re-enactment or religious purposes (e.g the Kirpan carried by some Sikhs)

Knives, edged /spiked weapons that are banned/restricted
There is a complete ban on the sale and import of some knives & offensive weapons:

  • Flick knives (also called ‘switchblades’ or ‘automatic knives’) – where the blade is hidden inside the handle and shoots out when a button is pressed
  • Butterfly knives – where the blade is hidden inside a handle that splits in two around it, like wings; the handles swing around the blade to open or close it
  • Disguised knives – eg where the blade is hidden inside a belt buckle or fake mobile phone
  • Gravity knives
  • Sword-sticks
  • Samurai swords/curved blade swords with a blade over 50 centimetres (with some exceptions, including antiques and swords made to traditional methods before 1954)
  • Hand or foot-claws
  • Push daggers
  • Hollow kubotan (cylinder-shaped keychain) holding spikes
  • Shuriken (also known as ‘death stars’ or ‘throwing stars’)
  • Kusari-gama (sickle attached to a rope, cord or wire)
  • Kyoketsu-shoge (hook-knife attached to a rope, cord or wire)

Other banned/restricted offensive weapons

  • Knuckledusters
  • Martial arts weapons such as, hollow kubotans and kusari (weight attached to a rope, cord or wire)
  • Batons and telescopic truncheons (ASPS)
  • Blowpipes or blowguns, except for use by vets or registered animal handlers

Circumstances where banned/restricted weapons excluding flick and gravity knives can be imported
Some organizations are allowed to hold banned/restricted weapons – but not firearms – for specified purposes. Groups permitted to import or possess banned/restricted weapons include:

  • Museums, galleries and universities – to present, display, research or interpret material of historic, artistic or scientific interest – such imports may also qualify for relief from duty and VAT
  • HM forces
  • Visiting forces
  • Police forces and the prison service – e.g direct imports of batons and truncheons(asps)
  • Those making commercial imports solely for onward supply to the police or prison service or trade samples to be evaluated in anticipation for such – evidence must be produced including a contract stating quantities, where applicable

There are also permitted reasons or exceptions to the import restrictions which include:

  • Theatrical performances – all offensive weapons excluding flick and gravity knives
  • Rehearsals of theatrical performances – all offensive weapons excluding flick and gravity knives
  • The production of films – all offensive weapons excluding flick and gravity knives
  • The production of television programmes – all offensive weapons excluding flick and gravity knives
  • Stealth knives designed for domestic use or for use in the processing, preparation or consumption of food or as a toy
  • There are exceptions to the import restrictions on swords with a curved blade of 50 centimeters or over provided that the weapon:

    • Was made before 1954 or made by traditional sword-making methods
    • Is only available for the purposes of use in religious ceremonies or for martial arts
    • Is for use in a ‘permitted activity’ for which public liability insurance is held

    Permitted activities include historical re-enactments or a sporting activity – eg martial arts demonstration.


    What counts as a firearm in the UK?

    Firearms are lethal-barrelled weapons but also include other weapons listed below. The import of firearms into the UK is controlled and illegal imports will be seized by UKBA officers. These include:

    • Rifles
    • Shotguns
    • Handguns
    • Automatic and semi-automatic firearms
    • CS gas canisters, pepper sprays and other self-defence sprays
    • High-voltage electric stun guns
    • High-powered air rifles over 12ft lbs. and pistols over 6ft lbs
    • Starter pistols with barrel venting gas
    • Blank firing guns with barrel venting gas
    • Humane killers/bolt guns

    All legitimate users of firearms must apply for the relevant import license or certificate from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), their regional police authority or the Home Office for handguns/pistols/revolvers and automatic/semi-automatic firearms. Visit the government site for more info


    APPENDIX A: Realistic Imitation Firearm (RIF) Guidance

    You can purchase/import a realistic imitation firearm for:

    1. The purposes of a museum or gallery;
    2. The purposes of theatrical performances and of rehearsals for such performances;
    3. The production of films (within the meaning of Part 1 of the Copyright, Designs
      and Patents Act 1988 (c. 48) – see section 5B of that Act);
    4. The production of television programmes (within the meaning of the
      Communications Act 2003 (c. 21) – see section 405(1) of that Act);
    5. The organisation and holding of historical re-enactments organised and held by
      persons specified or described for the purposes of this section by regulations
      made by the Secretary of State; allow ‘RIFs’ to be imported, manufactured and
      sold to bonafide Airsoft skirmishers or re-enactors were the organisers have 3rd
      party liability insurance;
    6. The purposes of functions that a person has in his capacity as a person in the
      service of Her Majesty

    The above information has been compiled to help inform buyers and sellers of UK law and legislation around weapons. This is a guide only and if in any doubt check with your local Police station, Government web pages or Firearms/weapons consultant, David W Dyson, who comes highly recommended in this field with over 30 years’ experience – Visit his site for more info.